In order to prevent a medical crisis, you have to know:
• What the early warning signs are.
• How to perceive the early signs and symptoms.
• How to interpret the information within the whole clinical picture.
• How to act for the benefit of the patient.
• What to do first.

As a healthcare professional, you care for patients with a higher acuity than ever before. You use the clinical signs of illness to help you recognize a patient care dilemma. What if you could see the signs that compensation was taking place before the process failed? You can! Setting goals and priorities in a crisis are crucial to outcomes. Some signs are more important than others and need to be taken care of first. This seminar will show you how to recognize the subtle signs of compensation and act to head off a crisis.

Our speaker, Carol Whiteside, MSN, PhD, will show you how to identify the signs and symptoms before the patient crashes. Carol will examine the body’s complex, interrelated organ systems and break them into their component parts. You will see how a problem in one organ system can cause a sign or symptom in another organ system. You will see how setting a bad goal, or no goal, can be very detrimental to the patient’s well being. If a crisis does occur, the effectiveness of setting goals and priorities will determine the outcome for the patient. Please join us for this valuable seminar and learn how to prevent and manage a crisis in your patient!


Seminar Objectives
  • Recognize the signs of compensation in the human body before illness appears.
  • Interpret what is happening in the body physiologically when the heart rate and respiratory rate go up.
  • Identify the components of cardiac output.
  • List three signs of left heart failure and describe the physiology behind them.
  • Describe two symptoms that differentiate ARDS from other forms of respiratory failure.
  • Identify the level of oxygen to be given a CO2 retaining COPDer in crisis.
  • Recognize three ways that CHF differs from the other forms of shock.
  • Explain two ways in which benign and malignant headaches differ in their presentation.
  • Relate four signs found through the “Look Test” indicating a change in the patient’s condition.
  • Describe the physiological mechanism driving the changes seen in patients after surgery.
  • Identify the first sign of compartment syndrome.
  • List three components of “painting the picture”.
  • Integrate the concept of critical thinking as it applies to your clinical practice and patient care.
Seminar Information
Date Presented:
May 24, 2010 9:30 AM Eastern
Length:
8 hours
Patient Crisis: Identify the Signs and Symptoms Before the Patient Crashes: Part 1
Outline

  • Cellular Metabolism
    • The city and the cell
    • ATP and the Kreb’s Cycle
  • Cardiopulmonary System
    • Oxygenate and perfuse at the same time
      • Oxygen transport to the cells
      • What the ABG is trying to tell you
      • Practice with ABG’s
      • How much oxygen do you give a CO2 retaining COPDer?
    • Cardiac output
      • Forms of shock and their treatment
        • Hypovolemic
        • Distributive
        • Cardiogenic
      • Left and right heart failure
        • Signs and symptoms
        • Treatments for CHF
    • Signs of compensation in the cardiopulmonary system
    • Myocardial ischemia in women
      • Differences in male and female presentation
  • The Inflammatory Process
    • Physiology of inflammation
      • The good part -- healing
      • The bad part – systemic inflammatory response syndrome
    • Adult respiratory distress syndrome
      • Clinical presentation
  • Headaches
    • Benign and malignant
    • Pain patterns
    • Characteristics vs. cause
    • Increase in ICP
    • Temporal arteritis
    • Meningitis
    • Primary and secondary headaches
  • The Look Test
    • “What da ya mean he doesn’t look right?”
    • Things you can’t measure and manipulate scientifically but are signs the patient is getting ready to crash
  • Surgery’s Effect on the Body’s Regulatory Systems
    • Surgical trauma and the response to injury
      • Re-absorption diuresis phase post op
  • The Earliest Sign of Compartment Syndrome
    • Blood flow in the muscle compartments
    • When the pressure in the compartment exceeds perfusion pressure
    • Complications
  • Conveying Your Concerns
    • Painting the picture
    • Responsibility
  • Critical Thinking
    • What it is and what it is not
    • Whiteside Critical Thinking Model
    • Case studies / patient care scenarios
Speaker Information
Carol Whiteside MSN, Ph.D.   [ view bio ]
Patient Crisis: Identify the Signs and Symptoms Before the Patient Crashes: Part 2
Patient Crisis: Identify the Signs and Symptoms Before the Patient Crashes: Part 3
Patient Crisis: Identify the Signs and Symptoms Before the Patient Crashes: Part 4
Individual topic purchase: Selected
Iowa Board of Nursing
Contact Hour: 7.60
PESI, LLC, is an approved provider by the Iowa Board of Nursing. Provider #: 346. This learner directed educational activity qualifies for 7.6 contact hours.
Florida Board of Nursing
Contact Hour: 6.30
PESI, LLC, is an approved provider by the Florida Board of Nursing. Provider #: 50-1586. This learner directed educational activity qualifies for 6.3 contact hours.
American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation
Contact Hour: 6.30
PESI, LLC is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Nurses completing these self-study materials will earn 6.3 contact hours.
California Board of Registered Nursing
Contact Hour: 6.30
PESI, LLC is a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 6538 for 6.3 contact hours.